Food additives and E numbers.

Click here to visit bodykind

Click here to visit Belle Lingerie

Novexpert cosmeceutical skincare - effective anti-ageing formulations that are suitable for sensitive skin
 

 

E Number Index
Additives known to cause tantrums
What additives do
Understanding food labelling
Fruit & vegetables for health
Salt and Sodium
Salt & sodium in children's foods
Herbs and Spices
Cereals
Foods to improve health
Good food suppliers
Food news
Archive
Terms of use
Contact us
Advertise on this site
Cookies

 

Latest Food Info:

The UK Food Standards Agency has published an update of BSE control breaches

European Commission proposes revisions to food and feed regulations

Flavouring substance 3-acetyl-2,5-dimethylthiophene raises safety concerns

Aspartame opinion rescheduled until November 2013

EFSA Revised Consumer Exposure To Caramel Colours

 

Welcome to the UK Food Guide, your guide to the E numbers and additives in and on our food. You will find information on all types of additives and E numbers used in both the manufacture and preservation of foodstuffs, chemicals used to grow our food, and the effects that E numbers and additives have upon us.

E102 Tartrazine.
Tartrazine appears to cause the most allergic and or intolerance reactions of all the azo dyes, particularly amongst those with an aspirin intolerance and asthmatics. Other reactions can include migraine, blurred vision, itching, rhinitis and purple skin patches, because of this more use is now being made of Annatto (E160b). In conjunction with Benzoic acid (E210) tartrazine appears to create an over-activity in children.
Tartrazine is a synthetic yellow azo dye found in fruit squash, fruit cordial, coloured fizzy drinks, instant puddings, cake mixes, custard powder, soups, sauces, ice cream, ice lollies, sweets, chewing gum, marzipan, jam, jelly, marmalade, mustard, yoghurt and many convenience foods together with glycerine, lemon and honey products. It can also be found in the shells of medicinal capsules. It can also be used with Brilliant Blue FCF, (E133) to produce various green shades e.g. for tinned processed peas.The Hyperactive Childrens Support Group believe that a link exists between this additive and hyperactive behavioural disorders in children.

E951 Aspartame
Aspartame sugar substitutes cause worrying symptoms from memory loss to brain tumours. But despite US FDA approval as a ‘safe’ additive, aspartame is one of the most dangerous substances ever to be foisted upon an unsuspecting public.
Aspartame is an intense sweetener, approximately 200 times sweeter than sugar. It has been used throughout the world in soft drinks and other low-cal or sugar free foods since 1974. It was first approved for use in the UK in 1982. It is known by the name NutraSweet, aspartame or E951.

FoE Real food campaignThe Truth in labelling campaignVegetarian Society FAIA The Parents Jury The Food Commission HACSG Food Standards Agency BBC Spanish foods, suppliers of serrano ham and spanish foods


Generic
Glitz4Girlz
No Straps, No Lines, Just Curves from Nudwear